#3 Whole of Life Consideration

The first three Principles help us to become aware of the importance of awareness. All of these perspectives and experiences that we are experiencing right now are merely and also uniquely, a moment in the long journey of our life. Consequently, for us as parents and teachers we must remain aware that each moment of our education is being received by our children and sorted into evidence of their own self stories about abilities and skills. The Concrete world of the primary school is all about building those stories of self and it extends into the Subtle world as more evidence is added to their kit. 

With our later stage perspectives and understanding of time and space we can be the buffer for the child’s future needs, setting guidelines for their next step. This is because at these early perspectives you can’t predict into the future, in fact you can barely remember yesterday with any clarity. To expect a child to focus out on their future is to deny them the power of being in the moment, and learning everything they can right there.

Our job as teachers and parents is to help guide them through the explorations they need to traverse, so that they are skilled and confident in the world. We need to help them articulate their learning needs in both this moment and for the future that they may face. The challenge of this role is to understand the impact of our own learning journey on identifying what we deem as important in this process, to understand how it impacts on their learning experience. 

A single moment in our learning journey may formulate our active patterns for the rest of our life. Sometimes these can form a psychological shadow but often they are just patterns we take as truths, self stories based on our experience in the collective. We need to identify our own patterns of learning and self stories so that they are in our present awareness, not running on automatic.

Our patterns of learning have been developed by our experiences from our own schooling and the labels or judgement that we have attached to our abilities and skills, and became, often unwittingly but still powerful filters for our life choices. As we awaken to the formation of these constructed patterns we run as “truths”, we can start to unearth our own stories about learning and recognise how they impact on our teaching and therefore our student’s learning. We may start to notice that we avoid certain topics, activities or prefer other choices. Our response to learning experiences can therefore have a profound impact on the way the child or learner gains their exposure from us. 

By remaining aware of the long span of an individual’s development, we can tread carefully and mindfully around the opportunities we provide our learners, as each moment offers the student a sense of courageous learning or fearful retreat. We must consider the choices we make as opportunities for integration of our own self stories and then consider how this moment will echo through the child’s journey. Let’s not build anything that may limit their opportunities for expansive vision by working hard on unpacking our own limitations. 

Principle #4
Principle #4

Sometimes the toughest thing is to face our own fears that working with children can trigger

Principle #2
Principle #2

To fully appreciate the child’s needs we need to stay open

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